Bag’s Take-Away:
AP photo tells me more about the situation of Iitate’s ”radiation refugees” in Fukushima Prefecture — 20% still there after the plume came through —  than I’d ever want to know.  (Caption below.)
» See more takes on Japan earthquake/nuke disaster photos at Bag and  Bag Tumblr.«
(photo: David Guttenfelder / AP caption: In this Wednesday May 25, 2011 photo, a goldfish swims in unfresh water in a fish tank on a elementary school classroom window ledge in the town of Iitate, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, after all of the children were evacuated from the town over fears of radiation. Residents of Iitate, nestled in mountains about 25 miles (40 kilometers) from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, originally were told it was safe for them to stay. Then they were advised to stay indoors. In late April they were told to leave, but unlike people who lived closer to the plant, they can’t be forced to go.)
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Bag’s Take-Away:

AP photo tells me more about the situation of Iitate’s ”radiation refugees” in Fukushima Prefecture — 20% still there after the plume came through —  than I’d ever want to know.  (Caption below.)

» See more takes on Japan earthquake/nuke disaster photos at Bag and Bag Tumblr

(photo: David Guttenfelder / AP caption: In this Wednesday May 25, 2011 photo, a goldfish swims in unfresh water in a fish tank on a elementary school classroom window ledge in the town of Iitate, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, after all of the children were evacuated from the town over fears of radiation. Residents of Iitate, nestled in mountains about 25 miles (40 kilometers) from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, originally were told it was safe for them to stay. Then they were advised to stay indoors. In late April they were told to leave, but unlike people who lived closer to the plant, they can’t be forced to go.)

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Follow us: BagNewsNotes. BAG Twitter. BAG Facebook.

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