Bag’s Take-Away:
 I thought this photo of Aung San Suu Kyi talking to a Myanmar Muslim leader had a certain foreboding about it. Then I looked at the hands: his on his heart, hers over it and think there may be hope for stifling religious strife in Myanmar.
via Reuters Editor’s Choice
(credit: Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters caption:  Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi talks to Myanmar Muslims leaders at the National League for Democracy head office in Yangon, Myanmar, June 6, 2012.)
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Topping LIFE.com’s 2011 Best Photo Blogs — also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Bag’s Take-Away:

I thought this photo of Aung San Suu Kyi talking to a Myanmar Muslim leader had a certain foreboding about it. Then I looked at the hands: his on his heart, hers over it and think there may be hope for stifling religious strife in Myanmar.

via Reuters Editor’s Choice

(credit: Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters caption: Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi talks to Myanmar Muslims leaders at the National League for Democracy head office in Yangon, Myanmar, June 6, 2012.)

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Bag’s Take-Away:
 Little Muslim boys love America as much as little Christian boys. 
(Regarding more images of Muslims  in Obama campaign photos, the economy isn’t getting better and Muslim-Americans are a voting bloc.)
via The New York Times Lens
(credit: Luke Sharrett/The New York Times caption:  A young supporter with a flag waits to shake hands with President Obama at St. Paul-Minneapolis International Airport.)
Visit BagNewsNotes: Today’s Media Images Analyzed
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Bag’s Take-Away:

Little Muslim boys love America as much as little Christian boys.

(Regarding more images of Muslims in Obama campaign photos, the economy isn’t getting better and Muslim-Americans are a voting bloc.)

via The New York Times Lens

(credit: Luke Sharrett/The New York Times caption: A young supporter with a flag waits to shake hands with President Obama at St. Paul-Minneapolis International Airport.)

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Bag’s Take-Away:
It doesn’t look too good for the rule of law when Iraqi police are ducking to avoid shrubbery. 
via MSNBC PhotoBlog
(credit:Kamal Akrayi/AFP/Getty Images caption:  Kurdish Protesters clash with ant-riot police in front of Kurdistan Parliament building in Erbil, north of Baghdad, Iraq on 08 May 2012. Hundred rallied in front of the Kurdistan parliament against the article by Norwegian Kurdish expatriate writer Halmat Goran published on 02 May in a local magazine Chrpa. The article is said to be offensive to Islam and to Muslims.)
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Bag’s Take-Away:

It doesn’t look too good for the rule of law when Iraqi police are ducking to avoid shrubbery.

via MSNBC PhotoBlog

(credit:Kamal Akrayi/AFP/Getty Images caption: Kurdish Protesters clash with ant-riot police in front of Kurdistan Parliament building in Erbil, north of Baghdad, Iraq on 08 May 2012. Hundred rallied in front of the Kurdistan parliament against the article by Norwegian Kurdish expatriate writer Halmat Goran published on 02 May in a local magazine Chrpa. The article is said to be offensive to Islam and to Muslims.)

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Tags #Iraq    #Kurds    #Islam    #Muslim    #Baghdad    #News    #Middle East    #Culture    #Photography    #Photojournalism    #Getty Images   

Bag’s Take-Away:
A photograph of the deceased is sadly incorporated into the grieving of his family. Since the start of the Arab Spring, funerals are depicted in every news gallery nearly every day. I can’t think of many photographs that bring a country’s culture of mourning so close to the viewer as this one does. The hand of the woman with the blue sleeve seems as if it is holding up the visor of the young man who passed. 
via The Sacramento Bee
(photo: Mohammed Asad/AP Photo caption: Egyptian women mourn over the death of victims of clashes outside the Defense Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday. Suspected supporters of Egypt’s military rulers attacked predominantly Islamist anti-government protesters outside the Defense Ministry in Cairo Wednesday, setting off clashes that left more than ten people dead as political tensions rise three weeks before crucial presidential elections.)
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Bag’s Take-Away:

A photograph of the deceased is sadly incorporated into the grieving of his family. Since the start of the Arab Spring, funerals are depicted in every news gallery nearly every day. I can’t think of many photographs that bring a country’s culture of mourning so close to the viewer as this one does. The hand of the woman with the blue sleeve seems as if it is holding up the visor of the young man who passed.

via The Sacramento Bee

(photo: Mohammed Asad/AP Photo caption: Egyptian women mourn over the death of victims of clashes outside the Defense Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday. Suspected supporters of Egypt’s military rulers attacked predominantly Islamist anti-government protesters outside the Defense Ministry in Cairo Wednesday, setting off clashes that left more than ten people dead as political tensions rise three weeks before crucial presidential elections.)

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Topping LIFE.com’s 2011 Best Photo Blogs — also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Tags #Culture    #Egypt    #Egyptian Elections    #Islam    #Islamicists    #Middle East    #Mourning    #Muslim    #News    #Photography    #Photojournalism    #Protest    #AP Photo    #Associated Press   

Bag’s Take-Away:

Of all the newswire images, this is the one that stands out, that really gives a sense both of the horrific scale  — 90+ dead, 5 bodies in this image alone — and of how sudden and unexpected the attack must have been on the island of Utoya. The dead lie where they were methodically killed one after the other, perhaps in desperate flight, or even before, when the assailant in police uniform had their initial trust.

The white sheets covering the corpses also identify the time specifically as after the gunman was arrested, but before they could be removed. It is a universal ritual to confer dignity to the dead by covering them, and in cases where there are many, like here, it also symbolizes equality and anonymity in suffering.

How many times have we seen these scenes from Iraq, Afghanistan, even Dover Air Force Base? How many times have I photographed them? Perhaps it is my New Yorker’s fantasy of the paradise of socialist Scandinavia in our American moment of hapless conservatism, but the news of this attack and this attendant image shocked me in a way that I thought could no longer happen. 

If the initial reporting is confirmed, that Anders Behring Breivik targeted the Labor Party youth camp on Utoya precisely for political reasons — along with massacre that wounded Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Arizona earlier this year — then the chickens really are coming home to roost. 

— photographer Alan Chin

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Topping LIFE.com’s 2011 list of Best Photo Blogs, follow us at: BagNewsNotes; BAG Twitter; BAG Facebook; Bag by Email.

Bag’s Take-Away:

Of all the newswire images, this is the one that stands out, that really gives a sense both of the horrific scale — 90+ dead, 5 bodies in this image alone — and of how sudden and unexpected the attack must have been on the island of Utoya. The dead lie where they were methodically killed one after the other, perhaps in desperate flight, or even before, when the assailant in police uniform had their initial trust.

The white sheets covering the corpses also identify the time specifically as after the gunman was arrested, but before they could be removed. It is a universal ritual to confer dignity to the dead by covering them, and in cases where there are many, like here, it also symbolizes equality and anonymity in suffering.

How many times have we seen these scenes from Iraq, Afghanistan, even Dover Air Force Base? How many times have I photographed them? Perhaps it is my New Yorker’s fantasy of the paradise of socialist Scandinavia in our American moment of hapless conservatism, but the news of this attack and this attendant image shocked me in a way that I thought could no longer happen.

If the initial reporting is confirmed, that Anders Behring Breivik targeted the Labor Party youth camp on Utoya precisely for political reasons — along with massacre that wounded Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Arizona earlier this year — then the chickens really are coming home to roost.

— photographer Alan Chin

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Topping LIFE.com’s 2011 list of Best Photo Blogs, follow us at: BagNewsNotes; BAG Twitter; BAG Facebook; Bag by Email.