Bag’s Take-Away:
I think this is true and I still don’t understand why corporate interests, which promote right wing causes all over the U.S., still penalize women for having the children they want her to have. 
via CoverJunkie
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Bag’s Take-Away:

I think this is true and I still don’t understand why corporate interests, which promote right wing causes all over the U.S., still penalize women for having the children they want her to have.

via CoverJunkie

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Bag’s Take-Away:

Because I am partisan, I should be upset at photos like those in the Gitta Seiler’s photo essay “Girls in Trouble”. The two above come from the “Aborted” section and take a particular and close look at two young women in an abortion clinic for underage girls in St. Petersburg. One communicates the carelessness and narcissism of one girl in the clinic: she slouches on a bed applying make-up to her admittedly beautiful face. Her dress is stylish. Just another day for her.

The second photo again captures youth but underlines youth’s inherent vulnerability as a more matronly, thicker woman leads a young girl wearing only her shirt with her rear exposed to the world. These careless and too-young women appear to be in abortion mill. But that’s just American-speak. I look at them closely and feel glad neither of them are forced to be mothers at a young age. That’s flip-side-of-the-coin American speak and, if anything, it tells you how loaded these images are for nearly anyone in our country.

via The New Yorker Photobooth

(credit: Gitta Seiler Shared caption: Abortion clinic for underage women, St. Petersburg, 2000)

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Good news, ladies. Tired of being on the front lines in the War on Women? Newsweek just announced that what women really want to do is “surrender.”
For those of you who thought that professional women might be fantasizing about earning the same salaries as their male counterparts, grabbing the reins at more Fortune 500 companies, achieving gender parity in Congress, or sitting at (rather than under) the desk in the Oval Office, think again. Newsweek leased its prime real estate to (post)feminist gadfly Katie Roiphe, who presents the (alleged) feminine fetish for sadomasochistic domination as feminism’s inconvenient truth.
Predictably, the blogosphere has taken Roiphe to task. Should we assume—based on her article—that this is punishment Roiphe (secretly) likes? If so, is Newsweek editor Tina Brown also “asking for it”? And what about the anonymous woman gracing Newsweek’s “link bait-y” cover?
The “working woman” getting so much attention as Newsweek’s eye candy looks more like a working girl (high class—of course). Her financial privilege is suggested by her carefully coiffed hair (note the salon quality backcombing), her elegant bone structure (a sign of good breeding), and the exaggerated bow on her silky onyx blindfold (S&M gear goes haute couture). Although she favors a power color for her lips, her open mouth and the vaguely contorted posture of her body (which leads the viewer to imagine her hands tied behind her back) signals a supposed desire to relinquish that power. Her naked body intimates that this persona is more authentic than her workday self. She is the elemental woman—stripped of pretense and relieved of power.
Ironically, the pesky power from which Newsweek thinks today’s working women needs to be unburdened is the real fantasy. Women still lag in salary, representation, and political credibility. But stereotypes about women (as citizens, voters, and workers) are often enforced visually, which is why the S&M aesthetic is used to sell everything from shoes to suits to booze; it’s even a go-to meme in politics, deployed to try to convince people to vote, go vegan, and stop patronizing circuses. Roiphe and Newsweek would have us believe that this “trend” represents a complicated and conflicted new feminism, but really it’s just the same old patriarchy at work. To be sure, women can be (and often are) participants in and perpetrators of patriarchy (I’m looking at you, Tina Brown).
If Newsweek wants to contribute to cultural understanding of the challenges “working women” face, they should focus on the real battles women wage every day for physical safety, economic security, political representation, and personal autonomy. That’s the war in which women cannot afford to surrender.
—Karrin Anderson
(photo credit: not attributed online)
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—————
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Good news, ladies. Tired of being on the front lines in the War on Women? Newsweek just announced that what women really want to do is “surrender.”

For those of you who thought that professional women might be fantasizing about earning the same salaries as their male counterparts, grabbing the reins at more Fortune 500 companies, achieving gender parity in Congress, or sitting at (rather than under) the desk in the Oval Office, think again. Newsweek leased its prime real estate to (post)feminist gadfly Katie Roiphe, who presents the (alleged) feminine fetish for sadomasochistic domination as feminism’s inconvenient truth.

Predictably, the blogosphere has taken Roiphe to task. Should we assume—based on her article—that this is punishment Roiphe (secretly) likes? If so, is Newsweek editor Tina Brown also “asking for it”? And what about the anonymous woman gracing Newsweek’s “link bait-y” cover?

The “working woman” getting so much attention as Newsweek’s eye candy looks more like a working girl (high class—of course). Her financial privilege is suggested by her carefully coiffed hair (note the salon quality backcombing), her elegant bone structure (a sign of good breeding), and the exaggerated bow on her silky onyx blindfold (S&M gear goes haute couture). Although she favors a power color for her lips, her open mouth and the vaguely contorted posture of her body (which leads the viewer to imagine her hands tied behind her back) signals a supposed desire to relinquish that power. Her naked body intimates that this persona is more authentic than her workday self. She is the elemental woman—stripped of pretense and relieved of power.

Ironically, the pesky power from which Newsweek thinks today’s working women needs to be unburdened is the real fantasy. Women still lag in salary, representation, and political credibility. But stereotypes about women (as citizens, voters, and workers) are often enforced visually, which is why the S&M aesthetic is used to sell everything from shoes to suits to booze; it’s even a go-to meme in politics, deployed to try to convince people to vote, go vegan, and stop patronizing circuses. Roiphe and Newsweek would have us believe that this “trend” represents a complicated and conflicted new feminism, but really it’s just the same old patriarchy at work. To be sure, women can be (and often are) participants in and perpetrators of patriarchy (I’m looking at you, Tina Brown).

If Newsweek wants to contribute to cultural understanding of the challenges “working women” face, they should focus on the real battles women wage every day for physical safety, economic security, political representation, and personal autonomy. That’s the war in which women cannot afford to surrender.

—Karrin Anderson

(photo credit: not attributed online)

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—————

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Tags #Bondage    #Culture    #Equal Pay    #Equal Rights    #Feminism    #News    #Newsweek    #Photography    #Reproductive Rights    #S&M    #Tina Brown    #Long Reads   

Bag’s Take-Away:
Think Romney will “be dogged by his pro-choice past”? (See caption on this Getty Images “blast from the past.” ) Gentlemen and ladies, start your Etch-a-Sketch!
via  BuzzFeed
(credit:  Getty Images caption: In this photo taken in January 1995 at the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (MWPC) awards ceremony, Romney is pictured with Evelyn Murphy, a former Lt. Governor; Ted Kennedy fundraiser Lisa McBirney; his own 1994 campaign fundraiser Priscilla Ruzzo. MWPC, is the state affiliate of the National Women’s Political Caucus, a nonpartisan group founded in 1971 by Gloria Steinem that “prides itself in increasing the number of pro-choice women elected and appointed into office every year.” MWCP lists it’s primary issues of concern as reproductive freedoms and the right to choice, equal and civil rights for all citizens regardless of sexual orientation, religion, or race, support for the Equal Rights Amendment, and accessible and affordable child care.)
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Bag’s Take-Away:

Think Romney will “be dogged by his pro-choice past”? (See caption on this Getty Images “blast from the past.” ) Gentlemen and ladies, start your Etch-a-Sketch!

via BuzzFeed

(credit: Getty Images caption: In this photo taken in January 1995 at the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (MWPC) awards ceremony, Romney is pictured with Evelyn Murphy, a former Lt. Governor; Ted Kennedy fundraiser Lisa McBirney; his own 1994 campaign fundraiser Priscilla Ruzzo. MWPC, is the state affiliate of the National Women’s Political Caucus, a nonpartisan group founded in 1971 by Gloria Steinem that “prides itself in increasing the number of pro-choice women elected and appointed into office every year.” MWCP lists it’s primary issues of concern as reproductive freedoms and the right to choice, equal and civil rights for all citizens regardless of sexual orientation, religion, or race, support for the Equal Rights Amendment, and accessible and affordable child care.)

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Bag’s Take-Away:
Win McNamee’s photo captures a “what have you done lately” vibe from the statue. Perhaps King’s expression is prescient: we clearly have far to go in this year of hoodies and state-ordered transvaginal ultrasounds. 
via  BBC Day in Pictures
(credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images  caption:  Participants gathered for a candlelight vigil at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial in Washington, DC on the 44th anniversary of his assassination.) 
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Bag’s Take-Away:

Win McNamee’s photo captures a “what have you done lately” vibe from the statue. Perhaps King’s expression is prescient: we clearly have far to go in this year of hoodies and state-ordered transvaginal ultrasounds.

via BBC Day in Pictures

(credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images caption: Participants gathered for a candlelight vigil at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial in Washington, DC on the 44th anniversary of his assassination.)

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Bag’s Take-Away:

On the positive side, both of the below ads were pulled by their respective companies.

On the less than positive side, is there something about today’s atmosphere that leads advertisers to believe this kind of ad is acceptable? Women in at least ten states (pdf file) want to know.

via The Jane Dough and AdWeek

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Bag’s Take-Away:

Juxtaposition of the Day

In the U.S. women are spoken down to while, currently, in Myanmar, of all places, they reach across to be heard.

Both photos are interesting for the position of women in the photo….I like the first one especially for that and for the fact the flowered bra (the most feminine aspect outside the women themselves) is at eye level for the men speaking down to them.

The second photo is quite lovely for an expression of power and femininity as Aung San Suu expresses her position on a more equivalent level.

Top Photo: via The New York Times Bottom Photo: via The New York Times Lens Blog

(top photo credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters Photos caption: Protesters argued with Santorum supporters outside a hotel in Gettysburg, Pa. bottom photo credit: Ye Aung Thu/Agence France-Presse—Getty Images caption: The leader of Myanmar’s democracy movement, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, addressed supporters at a campaign rally on the outskirts of Yangon on Wednesday. Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi is running for a seat in Parliament in elections being held April 1.)

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